Investcorp Credit Management BDC, Inc. filed 10-K

Investcorp Credit Management BDC, Inc. revealed 10-K form on Friday, Sep 13 accessible here.

Borrowings under the Term Financing, as amended, bear interest (a) with respect to the $102.0 million (i) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 2.55% through December 4, 2019, and (ii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.55% from December 5, 2019 through December 4, 2020, and (iii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.15% (if the Option is not exercised) or 2.90% (if the Option is exercised) from December 5, 2020 through December 5, 2021, and (b) with respect to the additional $20.0 million under the Term Financing, (i) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.15% through October 14, 2019, which is the date before the option could be exercised (the “Option Exercise Date”), and (ii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 2.90% from the Option Exercise Date through December 5, 2021.

On July 2, 2018, we closed the public offering of $30 million in aggregate principal amount of 6.125% notes due 2023 (the “Notes”). On July 12, 2018, the underwriters exercised their over-allotment option to purchase an additional $4.5 million in aggregate principal amount of the Notes. The total net proceeds to us from the Notes, including the exercise of the underwriters’ over-allotment option, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions of approximately $1.0 million and estimated offering expenses of approximately $230,000, were approximately $33.2 million.

The Notes will mature on July 1, 2023 and bear interest at a rate of 6.125%. The Notes are direct unsecured obligations and rank pari passu, which means equal in right of payment, with all outstanding and future unsecured indebtedness issued by us. Because the Notes are not secured by any of our assets, they are effectively subordinated to all of our existing and future secured unsubordinated indebtedness (or any indebtedness that is initially unsecured as to which we subsequently grant a security interest), to the extent of the value of the assets securing such indebtedness. The Notes are structurally subordinated to all existing and future indebtedness and other obligations of any of our subsidiaries and financing vehicles, including, without limitation, borrowings under the Term Financing and the Revolving Financing. The Notes are obligations exclusively of Investcorp Credit Management BDC, Inc. and not of any of our subsidiaries. None of our subsidiaries is a guarantor of the Notes and the Notes will not be required to be guaranteed by any subsidiary we may acquire or create in the future.

The indenture under which the Notes are issued (the “Indenture”) contains certain covenants, including covenants (i) requiring our compliance with the asset coverage requirements set forth in Section 18(a)(1)(A) as modified by Section 61(a) of the 1940 Act, whether or not we continue to be subject to such provisions of the 1940 Act; (ii) requiring our compliance, under certain circumstances, with the requirements set forth in Section 18(a)(1)(B) as modified by Section 61(a) of the 1940 Act, whether or not we continue to be subject to such provisions of the 1940 Act, prohibiting the declaration of any cash dividend or distribution upon any class of our capital stock (except to the extent necessary for us to maintain its treatment as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code), or purchasing any such capital stock, if our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, is below 150% at the time of the declaration of the dividend or distribution or the purchase and after deducting the amount of such dividend, distribution, or purchase; and (iii) requiring us to provide financial information to the holders of the Notes and the Trustee if we cease to be subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). These covenants are subject to limitations and exceptions that are described in the Indenture.

On May 2, 2018, our board of directors, including a “required majority” (as such term is defined in Section 57(o) of the 1940 Act) of the board, approved the modified asset coverage requirements set forth in Section 61(a)(2) of the 1940 Act, as amended by the Small Business Credit Availability Act. As a result, our asset coverage requirements for senior securities changed from 200% to 150%, effective as of May 2, 2019.

As of June 30, 2019, our portfolio consisted of debt and equity investments in 33 portfolio companies with a fair value of $306.4 million. As of June 30, 2019, our portfolio at fair value consisted of 77.7% first lien investments, 18.7% second lien investments, 3.6% unitranche loans, and no equity, warrant or other positions. At June 30, 2019, the weighted average total yield of debt and income producing securities at amortized cost (which includes income and amortization of fees and discounts) was 10.50%. At June 30, 2019, our weighted average total yield on investments at amortized cost (which includes interest income and amortization of fees and discounts) was 10.25%. The weighted average total yield was computed using an internal rate of return calculation of our debt investments based on contractual cash flows, including interest and amortization payments, and, for floating rate investments, the spot London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), as of June 30, 2019 of all of our debt investments. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”. The weighted average total yield of our debt investments is not the same as a return on investment for our stockholders but, rather, relates to a portion of our investment portfolio and is calculated before payment of all of our fees and expenses, including any sales load paid in connection with an offering of our securities. There can be no assurance that the weighted average total yield will remain at its current level.

On August 30, 2019, Investcorp Credit Management US LLC (“Investcorp”) acquired an approximate 76% ownership interest in the Adviser through the acquisition of the interests held by Stifel Venture Corp. (“Stifel”) and certain funds managed Cyrus Capital Partners, L.P. (the “Cyrus Funds”) and through a direct purchase of equity from the Adviser (the “Investcorp Transaction”). Investcorp is a leading global credit investment platform with assets under management of $11.7 billion as of June 30, 2019. Investcorp manages funds which invest primarily in senior secured corporate debt issued by mid and large-cap corporations in Western Europe and the United States. The business has a strong track record of consistent performance and growth, employing approximately 24 investment professionals in London, New York and Singapore. Investcorp is a subsidiary of Investcorp Bank B.S.C. (“Investcorp Bank”). Investcorp Bank and its consolidated subsidiaries, including Investcorp, are referred to as “Investcorp Group”. Investcorp Group is a global provider and manager of alternative investments, offering such investments to its high-net-worth private and institutional clients on a global basis. As of June 30, 2019, Investcorp Group had $28.2 billion in total assets under management, including assets managed by third party managers and assets subject to a non-discretionary advisory mandate where Investcorp Group receives fees calculated on the basis of assets under management. Investcorp Group employs approximately 427 people across its offices in New York, London, Bahrain, Abu Dhabi, Riyadh, Doha, Mumbai and Singapore. Investcorp Group has been engaged in the investment management and related services business since 1982, and is expected to bring enhanced capabilities to the Adviser.

In connection with the Investcorp Transaction, on June 26, 2019, our board of directors, including all of the directors who are not “interested persons” of the Company, as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the 1940 Act (each, an “Independent Director”), unanimously approved a new investment advisory agreement (the “New Advisory Agreement”) and recommended that the New Advisory Agreement be submitted to our stockholders for approval, which our stockholders approved at the Special Meeting of Stockholders held on August 28, 2019. At the closing of the Investcorp Transaction on August 30, 2019, we entered into the New Advisory Agreement with the Adviser, pursuant to which we pay the Adviser a management fee equal to 1.75% of our gross assets, payable in arrears on a quarterly basis. In addition, pursuant to the New Advisory Agreement, we pay the Adviser an incentive fee equal to 20.0% of pre-incentive fee net investment income, subject to an annualized hurdle rate of 8.0% with a “catch up” fee for returns between the 8.0% hurdle and 10.0%, as well as 20.0% of net capital gains. The New Advisory Agreement has substantially the same terms as the prior investment advisory agreement, dated February 5, 2014, between us and the Adviser (the “Prior Advisory Agreement”).

Identical to the terms of the Prior Advisory Agreement, under the New Advisory Agreement, the Base Management Fee will be calculated at an annual rate of 1.75% of our gross assets, including assets purchased with borrowed funds or other forms of leverage and excluding cash and cash equivalents (such amount, “Gross Assets”). The Base Management Fee is payable quarterly in arrears and the Base Management Fees for any partial month or quarter will be appropriately pro-rated.

Under the New Advisory Agreement and the Prior Advisory Agreement, the Income-Based Fee is calculated and payable quarterly in arrears based on our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income (as defined below) for the immediately preceding fiscal quarter, subject to a total return requirement (the “Total Return Requirement”) and deferral of non-cash amounts, and is 20.0% of the amount, if any, by which our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income, expressed as a rate of return on the value of our net assets attributable to its common stock, for the immediately preceding fiscal quarter, exceeds a 2.0% (which is 8.0% annualized) hurdle rate and a “catch-up” provision measured as of the end of each fiscal quarter. Under this provision, in any fiscal quarter, the Adviser receives no Incentive Fee until our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income equals the hurdle rate of 2.0%, but then receives, as a “catch-up,” 100% of our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income with respect to that portion of such Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income, if any, that exceeds the hurdle rate but is less than 2.5% (which is 10.0% annualized). The effect of the “catch-up” provision is that, subject to the Total Return Requirement and deferral provisions discussed below, if Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income exceeds 2.5% in any fiscal quarter, the Adviser receives 20.0% of our Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income as if a hurdle rate did not apply.

Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income does not include any realized capital gains, realized capital losses or unrealized capital appreciation or depreciation. Because of the structure of the Incentive Fee, it is possible that we may pay an Incentive Fee in a quarter where we incur a loss, subject to the Total Return Requirement and deferral of non-cash amounts. For example, if we receive Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income in excess of the quarterly minimum hurdle rate, we would pay the applicable Incentive Fee even if we have incurred a loss in that quarter due to realized and unrealized capital losses. Our net investment income used to calculate this component of the Incentive Fee is also included in the amount of its gross assets used to calculate the 1.75% Base Management Fee. These calculations are appropriately prorated for any period of less than three months and adjusted for any share issuances or repurchases during the current quarter.

Under the Prior Advisory Agreement, no Income-Based Fee was payable except to the extent 20.0% of the cumulative net increase in net assets resulting from operations over the then current and 11 preceding quarters exceeded the cumulative Incentive Fees accrued and/or paid for the 11 preceding quarters. In other words, any Income-Based Fee that was payable in a quarter was limited to the lesser of (i) 20.0% of the amount by which the Company’s Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income for such quarter exceeded the 2.0% hurdle, subject to the “catch-up” provision, and (ii) (x) 20.0% of the cumulative net increase in net assets resulting from operations for the then current and 11 preceding quarters minus (y) the cumulative Incentive Fees accrued and/or paid for the 11 preceding quarters. For the foregoing purpose, the “cumulative net increase in net assets resulting from operations” is the amount, if positive, of the sum of Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income, realized gains and losses and unrealized appreciation and depreciation of the Company for the then current and 11 preceding calendar quarters.

Under the New Advisory Agreement, the calculation period for the Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income is based on fiscal quarters rather than calendar quarters. In addition, effective on the Commencement Date, the Total Return Requirement for the Income-Based Fee was reset to begin on September 30, 2019. No Income-Based Fee is payable under the New Advisory Agreement except to the extent 20.0% of the cumulative net increase in net assets resulting from operations over the fiscal quarter for which fees are being calculated and the Lookback Period exceeds the cumulative Incentive Fees accrued and/or paid for the Lookback Period. For the foregoing purpose, the “cumulative net increase in net assets resulting from operations” is the amount, if positive, of the sum of Pre-Incentive Fee Net Investment Income, realized gains and losses and unrealized appreciation and depreciation of the Company for the then current fiscal quarter and the Lookback Period. The “Lookback Period” means (1) through June 30, 2022, the period that on the last day of the fiscal quarter in which the Commencement Date occurs and ends on the last day of the fiscal quarter immediately preceding the fiscal quarter for which the Income-Based Fee is being calculated, and (2) after June 30, 2022, the eleven fiscal quarters immediately preceding the fiscal quarter for which the Income-Based Fee is being calculated.

Under the Prior Advisory Agreement, the Capital Gains Fee was determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each calendar year (or upon termination of the Prior Advisory Agreement, as of the termination date), commencing with the calendar year ending on December 31, 2014, and was equal to 20.0% of our cumulative aggregate realized capital gains from inception through the end of each calendar year, computed net of our aggregate cumulative realized capital losses and our aggregate cumulative unrealized capital depreciation through the end of such year, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid Capital Gains Fees. If such amount is negative, then no Capital Gains Fee is payable for such year. Additionally, if the Prior Advisory Agreement was terminated as of a date that is not a calendar year end, the termination date was treated as though it were a calendar year end for purposes of calculating and paying the Capital Gains Fee. No Capital Gains Fee was paid to the Adviser under the Prior Advisory Agreement.

Substantially the same as the terms of the Prior Advisory Agreement, under the New Advisory Agreement, the Capital Gains Fee is determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each fiscal year (or upon termination of the New Advisory Agreement, as of the termination date), commencing with the fiscal year ending June 30, 2021, and will equal to 20.0% of our cumulative aggregate realized capital gains from the Commencement Date through the end of that fiscal year, computed net of our aggregate cumulative realized capital losses and our aggregate cumulative unrealized capital depreciation through the end of such year, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid Capital Gains Fees. If such amount is negative, then no Capital Gains Fee will be payable for such year. Additionally, if the New Advisory Agreement is terminated as of a date that is not a fiscal year end, the termination date will be treated as though it were a fiscal year end for purposes of calculating and paying the Capital Gains Fee. For the avoidance of doubt, realized capital gains, realized capital losses, unrealized capital appreciation and unrealized capital depreciation with respect to the Company’s portfolio as of the end of the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020 will be excluded from the calculations of the Capital Gains Fee.

Pre-incentive fee net investment income exceeds the hurdle rate, but does not fully satisfy the “catch-up” provision; therefore the income related portion of the incentive fee is 0.2625%.

Pre-incentive fee net investment income exceeds the hurdle rate, and fully satisfies the “catch-up” provision; therefore the income related portion of the incentive fee is 0.5725%.

(4) The “catch-up” provision is intended to provide the Adviser with an incentive fee of 20.0% on all pre-incentive fee net investment income as if a hurdle rate did not apply when our net investment income exceeds 2.5% in any fiscal quarter.

The “catch-up” provision is intended to provide the Adviser with an incentive fee of 20.0% on all pre-incentive fee net investment income as if a hurdle rate did not apply when our net investment income exceeds 2.5% in any fiscal quarter.

Although our pre-incentive fee net investment income exceeds the hurdle rate of 2.0% (as shown in Alternative 3 of Example 1 above), no incentive fee is payable because 20.0% of the cumulative net increase in net assets resulting from operations over the then current and 11 preceding calendar quarters did not exceed the cumulative income and capital gains incentive fees accrued and/or paid for the preceding 11 calendar quarters.

Because our pre-incentive fee net investment income exceeds the hurdle rate of 2.0% and because 20.0% of the cumulative net increase in net assets resulting from operations over the then current and 11 preceding calendar quarters exceeds the cumulative income and capital gains incentive fees accrued and/or paid for the preceding 11 calendar quarters, an incentive fee would be payable, as shown in Alternative 3 of Example 1 above.

(4) The “catch-up” provision is intended to provide the Adviser with an incentive fee of 20.0% on all pre-incentive fee net investment income as if a hurdle rate did not apply when our net investment income exceeds 2.5% in any fiscal quarter.

The “catch-up” provision is intended to provide the Adviser with an incentive fee of 20.0% on all pre-incentive fee net investment income as if a hurdle rate did not apply when our net investment income exceeds 2.5% in any fiscal quarter.

(2) As noted above, it is possible that the cumulative aggregate capital gains fee received by the Adviser ($0.70 million) is effectively greater than $0.45 million (20% of cumulative aggregate realized capital gains less net realized capital losses or net unrealized depreciation ($2.25 million)).

As noted above, it is possible that the cumulative aggregate capital gains fee received by the Adviser ($0.70 million) is effectively greater than $0.45 million (20% of cumulative aggregate realized capital gains less net realized capital losses or net unrealized depreciation ($2.25 million)).

In addition to reviewing the appropriateness of the terms of the New Advisory Agreement and the relative performance of the Adviser and the Company, our board of directors considered the differentiated investment strategy of the Company, which focuses on generating both current income and capital appreciation by investing in debt and related equity investments of privately held middle-market companies. The Company invests primarily in middle-market companies in the form of unitranche loans and standalone first and second lien loans. The Company may also invest in unsecured debt and bonds and in the equity of portfolio companies through warrants and other instruments. The Company generally defines middle market companies as those with an enterprise value that represents the aggregate of debt value and equity value of the entity of less than $750 million, although it may invest in larger or smaller companies. As of June 30, 2019, 100.0% of the Company’s portfolio was invested in senior secured loans.

We may invest up to 100% of our assets in securities acquired directly from issuers in privately negotiated transactions. With respect to such securities, we may, for the purpose of public resale, be deemed an “underwriter” as that term is defined in the Securities Act. Our intention is to not write (sell) or buy put or call options to manage risks associated with the publicly traded securities of our portfolio companies, except that we may enter into hedging transactions to manage the risks associated with interest rate fluctuations. However, we may purchase or otherwise receive warrants to purchase the common stock of our portfolio companies in connection with acquisition financing or other investments. Similarly, in connection with an acquisition, we may acquire rights to require the issuers of acquired securities or their affiliates to repurchase them under certain circumstances. We also do not intend to acquire securities issued by any investment company that exceed the limits imposed by the 1940 Act. Under these limits, we generally cannot acquire more than 3% of the voting stock of any registered investment company, invest more than 5% of the value of our total assets in the securities of one investment company or invest more than 10% of the value of our total assets in the securities of more than one investment company. With regard to that portion of our portfolio invested in securities issued by investment companies, it should be noted that such investments might subject our stockholders to additional expenses. None of these policies is fundamental and may be changed without stockholder approval upon 60 days’ prior written notice to stockholders.

(4) Securities of an eligible portfolio company purchased from any person in a private transaction if there is no ready market for such securities and we already own 60% of the outstanding equity of the eligible portfolio company.

Securities of an eligible portfolio company purchased from any person in a private transaction if there is no ready market for such securities and we already own 60% of the outstanding equity of the eligible portfolio company.

so that 70% of our assets are qualifying assets or temporary investments. Typically, we will invest in U.S. Treasury bills or in repurchase agreements, so long as the agreements are fully collateralized by cash or securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies. A repurchase agreement involves the purchase by an investor, such as us, of a specified security and the simultaneous agreement by the seller to repurchase it at an agreed-upon future date and at a price that is greater than the purchase price by an amount that reflects an agreed-upon interest rate. There is no percentage restriction on the proportion of our assets that may be invested in such repurchase agreements. However, if more than 25% of our total assets constitute repurchase agreements from a single counterparty, we would not meet the diversification tests in order to qualify as a RIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Accordingly, we do not intend to enter into repurchase agreements with a single counterparty in excess of this limit. The Adviser will monitor the creditworthiness of the counterparties with which we enter into repurchase agreement transactions.

We are generally permitted, under specified conditions, to issue multiple classes of indebtedness and one class of stock senior to our common stock if our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, is at least equal to 200% immediately after each such issuance. In addition, while any senior securities remain outstanding, we must make provisions to prohibit any distribution to our stockholders or the repurchase of such securities or shares unless we meet the applicable asset coverage ratios at the time of the distribution or repurchase. However, the Small Business Credit Availability Act has modified the 1940 Act by allowing a BDC to increase the maximum amount of leverage it may incur from an asset coverage ratio of 200% to an asset coverage ratio of 150%, if certain requirements are met.

stockholders as dividends. To qualify as a RIC, we must, among other things, meet certain source-of-income and asset diversification requirements (as described below). In addition, to qualify for RIC tax treatment we must distribute to our stockholders, for each taxable year, at least 90% of our “investment company taxable income,” which is generally our ordinary income plus the excess of our realized net short-term capital gains over our realized net long-term capital losses (the “Annual Distribution Requirement”).

We will be subject to a 4% nondeductible U.S. federal excise tax on certain undistributed income unless we distribute in a timely manner an amount at least equal to the sum of (1) 98% of our net ordinary income for each calendar year, (2) 98.2% of our capital gain net income for the one-year period ending October 31 in that calendar year and (3) any income recognized, but not distributed, in preceding years (the “Excise Tax Avoidance Requirement”).

• no more than 25% of the value of our assets is invested in the securities, other than U.S. government securities or securities of other RICs, of one issuer, of two or more issuers that are controlled, as determined under applicable Code rules, by us and that are engaged in the same or similar or related trades or businesses or of certain “qualified publicly traded partnerships” (the “Diversification Tests”).

no more than 25% of the value of our assets is invested in the securities, other than U.S. government securities or securities of other RICs, of one issuer, of two or more issuers that are controlled, as determined under applicable Code rules, by us and that are engaged in the same or similar or related trades or businesses or of certain “qualified publicly traded partnerships” (the “Diversification Tests”).

In accordance with certain applicable Treasury regulations and a revenue procedure issued by the Internal Revenue Service, a RIC may treat a distribution of its own stock as fulfilling its RIC distribution requirements if each stockholder may elect to receive his or her entire distribution in either cash or stock of the RIC, subject to a limitation that the aggregate amount of cash to be distributed to all stockholders must be at least 20% of the aggregate declared distribution. If too many stockholders elect to receive cash, each stockholder electing to receive cash must receive a pro rata amount of cash (with the balance of the distribution paid in stock). In no event will any stockholder, electing to receive cash, receive less than 20% of his or her entire distribution in cash. If these and certain other requirements are met, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the amount of the dividend paid in stock will be equal to the amount of cash that could have been received instead of stock. We have no current intention of paying dividends in shares of our stock in accordance with these Treasury regulations or the revenue procedure.

If we fail to satisfy the 90% Income Test or the Diversification Tests for any taxable year, we may nevertheless continue to qualify as a RIC for such year if certain relief provisions are applicable (which may, among other things, require us to pay certain corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes or to dispose of certain assets).

If we were unable to qualify for treatment as a RIC and the foregoing relief provisions are not applicable, we would be subject to tax on all of our taxable income at regular corporate rates, regardless of whether we make any distributions to our stockholders. Distributions would not be required, and any distributions would be taxable to our stockholders as ordinary dividend income that, subject to certain limitations, may be eligible for the 20% maximum rate to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits provided certain holding period and other requirements were met. Subject to certain limitations under the Code, corporate distributees would be eligible for the dividends-received deduction. Distributions in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits would be treated first as a return of capital to the extent of the stockholder’s tax basis, and any remaining distributions would be treated as a capital gain. To requalify as a RIC in a subsequent taxable year, we would be required to satisfy the RIC qualification requirements for that year and dispose of any earnings and profits from any year in which we failed to qualify as a RIC. Subject to a limited exception applicable to RICs that qualified as such under Subchapter M of the Code for at least one year prior to disqualification and that requalify as a RIC no later than the second year following the nonqualifying year, we could be subject to tax on any unrealized net built-in gains in the assets held by us during the period in which we failed to qualify as a RIC that are recognized within the subsequent five years, unless we made a special election to pay corporate-level U.S. federal income tax on such built-in gain at the time of our requalification as a RIC.

Investcorp has an approximate 76% economic interest in the Adviser. Pursuant to the services agreement with Investcorp International Inc. (“Investcorp International”), an affiliate of Investcorp (the “Investcorp Services Agreement”), the Adviser is able to utilize personnel of Investcorp International and its affiliates to provide services to the Company from time-to-time on an as-needed basis related to human resources, compensation and technology services. The Adviser may rely on the Investcorp Services Agreement to satisfy its obligations under the New Administration Agreement. The personnel of Investcorp International may also provide services for the funds managed by Investcorp, which could result in conflicts of interest and may distract them from their responsibilities to us.

We may be obligated to pay the Adviser incentive compensation even if we incur a loss and may pay more than 20.0% of our net capital gains because we cannot recover payments made in previous years.

The Adviser is entitled to incentive compensation for each fiscal quarter in an amount equal to a percentage of the excess of our investment income for that quarter (before deducting incentive compensation) above a threshold return for that quarter. Thus, we may be required to pay the Adviser incentive compensation for a fiscal quarter even if there is a decline in the value of our portfolio or we incur a net loss for that quarter. If we pay an incentive fee of 20% of our realized capital gains (net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation on a cumulative basis) and thereafter experience additional realized capital losses or unrealized capital depreciation, we will not be able to recover any portion of the incentive fee previously paid.

We may need additional capital to fund new investments and grow our portfolio of investments. We intend to access the capital markets periodically to issue debt or equity securities or borrow from financial institutions in order to obtain such additional capital. Unfavorable economic conditions could increase our funding costs, limit our access to the capital markets or result in a decision by lenders not to extend credit to us. A reduction in the availability of new capital could limit our ability to grow. In addition, we are required to distribute at least 90% of our net ordinary income and net short-term capital gains in excess of net long-term capital losses, if any, to our stockholders to maintain our qualification as a RIC. As a result, these earnings will not be available to fund new investments. An inability on our part to access the capital markets successfully could limit our ability to grow our business and execute our business strategy fully and could decrease our earnings, if any, which would have an adverse effect on the value of our securities.

We may issue debt securities or preferred stock and/or borrow money from banks or other financial institutions, which we refer to collectively as “senior securities,” up to the maximum amount permitted by the 1940 Act. Under the provisions of the 1940 Act, we are permitted as a BDC to issue senior securities in amounts such that our asset coverage ratio, as defined in the 1940 Act, equals at least 200% of our gross assets less all liabilities and indebtedness not represented by senior securities, after each issuance of senior securities. If the value of our assets declines, we may be unable to satisfy this test. If that happens, we would not be able to borrow additional funds until we were able to comply with the 200% asset coverage ratio under the 1940 Act. Also, any amounts that we use to service our indebtedness would not be available for distributions to our common stockholders. If we issue senior securities, we will be exposed to typical risks associated with leverage, including an increased risk of loss.

We are not generally able to issue and sell our common stock at a price below net asset value per share. We may, however, sell our common stock, or warrants, options or rights to acquire our common stock, at a price below then-current net asset value per share of our common stock if our board of directors determines that such sale is in our best interests. At a meeting initially convened on November 6, 2018 and reconvened on December 18, 2018, our stockholders voted to allow us to issue common stock at a price below net asset value per share for the period ending on the earlier of the one year anniversary of the date of the Company’s 2018 Annual Meeting of Stockholders and the date of the Company’s 2019 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which we expect to be held in November 2019. Our stockholders did not specify a maximum discount below net asset value at which we are able to issue our common stock, although the number of shares sold in each offering may not exceed 25% of our outstanding common stock immediately prior to such sale. In addition, we cannot issue shares of our common stock below net asset value unless our board of directors determines that it would be in our and our stockholders’ best interests to do so. Sales of common stock at prices below net asset value per share dilute the interests of existing stockholders, have the effect of reducing our net asset value per share and may reduce our market price per share. In addition, continuous sales of common stock below net asset value may have a negative impact on total returns and could have a negative impact on the market price of our shares of common stock. If we raise additional funds by issuing common stock or senior securities convertible into, or exchangeable for, our common stock, then the percentage ownership of our stockholders at that time will decrease, and you may experience dilution.

In accordance with the Small Business Credit Availability Act, on May 2, 2018, our board of directors, including a “required majority” approved the modified asset coverage requirements set forth in Section 61(a)(2) of the 1940 Act. As a result, our asset coverage requirements for senior securities changed from 200% to 150%, effective May 2, 2019.

The Financing Facilities are, and any future borrowing facility may be, backed by all or a portion of our loans and securities on which the lenders will or, in the case of a future facility, may have a security interest. We may pledge up to 100% of our assets and may grant a security interest in all of our assets under the terms of any debt instrument we enter into with lenders. We expect that any security interests we grant will be set forth in a pledge and security agreement and evidenced by the filing of financing statements by the agent for the lenders. In addition, we expect that the custodian for our securities serving as collateral for such loan would include in its electronic systems notices indicating the existence of such security interests and, following notice of occurrence of an event of default, if any, and during its continuance, will only accept transfer instructions with respect to any such securities from the lender or its designee. If we were to default under the terms of any debt instrument, the agent for the applicable lenders would be able to assume control of the timing of disposition of any or all of our assets securing such debt, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

As a BDC, we may not acquire any assets other than “qualifying assets” unless, at the time of and after giving effect to such acquisition, at least 70% of our total assets are qualifying assets.

approximately 10.21% of the fair value of our portfolio. If an industry in which we have significant investments suffers from adverse business or economic conditions, as these industries have to varying degrees, a material portion of our investment portfolio could be affected adversely, which, in turn, could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

Our investments in portfolio companies that operate in the professional services industry represent approximately 13.52% of our total portfolio as of June 30, 2019. Our investments in portfolio companies in the professional services sector include those that provide services related to data and information, building, cleaning and maintenance services, and energy efficiency services. Portfolio companies in the professional services sector are subject to many risks, including the negative impact of regulation, changing technology, a competitive marketplace and difficulty in obtaining financing. Portfolio companies in the professional services industry must respond quickly to technological changes and understand the impact of these changes on customers’ preferences. Adverse economic, business, or regulatory developments affecting the professional services sector could have a negative impact on the value of our investments in portfolio companies operating in this industry, and therefore could negatively impact our business and results of operations.

Shares of closed-end investment companies, including BDCs, may trade at a discount from net asset value. This characteristic of closed-end investment companies and BDCs is separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value per share may decline. We cannot predict whether our common stock will trade at, above or below net asset value. At a meeting initially convened on November 6, 2018 and reconvened on December 18, 2018, our stockholders voted to allow us to issue common stock at a price below net asset value per share for the period ending on the earlier of the one year anniversary of the date of the Company’s 2018 Annual Meeting of Stockholders and the date of the Company’s 2019 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which we expect to be held in November 2019. Our stockholders did not specify a maximum discount below net asset value at which we are able to issue our common stock, although the number of shares sold in each offering may not exceed 25% of our outstanding common stock immediately prior to such sale. In addition, we cannot issue shares of our common stock below net asset value unless our board of directors determines that it would be in our and our stockholders’ best interests to do so. Sales of common stock at prices below net asset value per share dilute the interests of existing stockholders, have the effect of reducing our net asset value per share and may reduce our market price per share. In addition, continuous sales of common stock below net asset value may have a negative impact on total returns and could have a negative impact on the market price of our shares of common stock. See “—Existing stockholders may incur dilution if, in the future, we sell shares of our common stock in one or more offerings at prices below the then current net asset value per share of our common stock” for a discussion of a proposal approved by our stockholders that permits us to issue shares of our common stock below net asset value.

The 1940 Act prohibits us from selling shares of our common stock at a price below the current net asset value per share of such stock, with certain exceptions. One such exception is prior stockholder approval of issuances below net asset value provided that our board of directors makes certain determinations. In this regard, at a meeting initially convened on November 6, 2018 and reconvened on December 18, 2018, our stockholders voted to allow us to issue common stock at a price below net asset value per share for the period ending on the earlier of the one year anniversary of the date of the Company’s 2018 Annual Meeting of Stockholders and the date of the Company’s 2019 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which we expect to be held in November 2019. Our stockholders did not specify a maximum discount below net asset value at which we are able to issue our common stock, although the number of shares sold in each offering may not exceed 25% of our outstanding common stock immediately prior to such sale. In addition, we cannot issue shares of our common stock below net asset value unless our board of directors determines that it would be in our and our stockholders’ best interests to do so. Continued access to this exception will require approval of similar proposals at future stockholder meetings. Any decision to sell shares of our common stock below the then current net asset value per share of our common stock would be subject to the determination by our board of directors that such issuance is in our and our stockholders’ best interests.

Illustration: Example of Dilutive Effect of the Issuance of Shares Below Net Asset Value. The example assumes that Company XYZ has 13,500,000 common shares outstanding, $300,000,000 in total assets and $100,000,000 in total liabilities. The current net asset value and net asset value per share are thus $200,000,000 and $14.81. The table illustrates the dilutive effect on nonparticipating Stockholder A of (1) an offering of 1,350,000 shares (10% of the outstanding shares) at $13.33 per share after offering expenses and commissions (a 10% discount from net asset value).

Our two largest investors are Stifel and funds managed by Cyrus Capital, which we refer to as the Cyrus Funds. Stifel owns approximately 16% of our total outstanding common stock, and the Cyrus Funds own, in the aggregate, approximately 28% of our total outstanding common stock. The shares held by Stifel and the Cyrus Funds are generally freely tradable in the public market, subject to the volume limitations, applicable holding periods and other provisions of Rule 144 under the Securities Act. Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock, the availability of such common stock for sale or the registration of such common stock for sale and the ability of our stockholders, including Stifel and the Cyrus Funds to sell their respective shares at a price per share that is below our then current net asset value per share could adversely affect the prevailing market prices for our common stock. If this occurs and continues it could impair our ability to raise additional capital through the sale of securities should we desire to do so and negatively impact the market of our common stock.

our board of directors, including a “required majority” approved the modified asset coverage requirements set forth in Section 61(a)(2) of the 1940 Act. As a result, our asset coverage requirements for senior securities changed from 200% to 150%, effective May 2, 2019. See “—The Small Business Credit Availability Act allows us to incur additional leverage”.

our board of directors, including a “required majority” approved the modified asset coverage requirements set forth in Section 61(a)(2) of the 1940 Act. As a result, our asset coverage requirements for senior securities changed from 200% to 150%, effective May 2, 2019. See “—The Small Business Credit Availability Act allows us to incur additional leverage”.

To qualify for RIC tax treatment, we must, among other things, distribute at least 90% of our net ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any.

CM Finance LLC, a Maryland limited liability company, commenced operations in March 2012. Immediately prior to our initial public offering, the Merger was consummated, whereby CM Finance LLC merged with and into us. In connection with the Merger, we issued 6,000,000 shares of common stock and $39.8 million in debt to the pre-existing CM Finance LLC investors, consisting of the Cyrus Funds. CM Finance Inc had no assets or operations prior to completion of the Merger and, as a result, the books and records of CM Finance LLC became our books and records, as the surviving entity. Immediately after the Merger, we issued 2,181,818 shares of our common stock to Stifel in exchange for $32.7 million in cash. We used all of the proceeds of the sale of shares to Stifel, to repurchase 2,181,818 shares of common stock from the Cyrus Funds. Immediately after the completion of the initial public offering, we had 13,666,666 shares outstanding. We also used a portion of the net proceeds of the initial public offering to repay 100% of the debt issued to the Cyrus Funds in connection with the Merger.

Non-accrual: Loans are placed on non-accrual status when principal or interest payments are past due 90 days or more or when there is reasonable doubt that principal or interest will be collected. Accrued interest is generally reversed when a loan is placed on non-accrual status. Interest payments received on non-accrual loans may be recognized as income or applied to principal depending upon management’s judgment about ultimate collectability of principal. Non-accrual loans are restored to accrual status when past due principal and interest is paid and, in management’s judgment, are likely to remain current. PIK interest is not accrued if we do not expect the issuer to be able to pay all principal and interest when due. As of June 30, 2019, we had one investment on non-accrual status, which represented approximately 3.0% of our portfolio at fair value. As of June 30, 2018, we had no investments on non-accrual status.

We have, through CM Finance SPV Ltd. (“CM SPV”), our wholly owned subsidiary, entered into a $122.0 million term secured financing facility (the “Term Financing”), due December 5, 2021 with UBS AG, London Branch (together with its affiliates “UBS”). The Term Financing is collateralized by a portion of the debt investments in our portfolio. Prior to amending the Term Financing on June 21, 2019, borrowings under the Term Financing bear interest (i) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 2.75% through December 4, 2018, and (ii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 2.55% from December 5, 2018 through December 5, 2020 (the “Term Financing Rate”). We also incurred an annual fee of approximately 1% of the outstanding borrowings under the Term Financing. On June 21, 2019, we amended the Term Financing and increase the Term Financing by $20.0 million from $102.0 million to $122.0 million. On September 30, 2019, with the consent of UBS, we can opt (the “Option’) to increase our Term Financing by up to $53.0 million, expanding the Term Financing to $175.0 million.

Borrowings under the Term Financing, as amended, bear interest (a) with respect to the $102.0 million (i) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 2.55% through December 4, 2019, and (ii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.55% from December 5, 2019 through December 4, 2020, and (iii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.15% (if the Option was not exercised) or 2.90% if the Option was exercised from December 5, 2020 through December 5, 2021, and (b) with respect to the additional $20.0 million increase in the Term Financing, (i) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.15% through October 14, 2019, which is the date before the Option Exercise Date, and (ii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 2.90% from the Option Exercise Date through December 5, 2021.

On November 20, 2017, we entered into a $50 million revolving financing facility (the “2017 UBS Revolving Financing”) with UBS. On June 21, 2019, we amended the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing to reduce the size of the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing to $30.0 million and extend the maturity date (as amended, the “Revolving Financing”). Borrowings under the Revolving Financing will generally bear interest at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.15%. The Company will pay a fee on any undrawn amounts of 2.25% per annum; provided that if 50% or less of the Revolving Financing is drawn, the fee will be 2.50% per annum. Any amounts borrowed under the Revolving Financing will mature, and all accrued and unpaid interest will be due and payable, on December 7, 2020. As of June 30, 2019, there were $11.0 million borrowings outstanding under the Revolving Financing. We refer to the Term Financing and the Revolving Financing together as the “Financing Facilities.” On November 9, 2016, we entered into a $50 million senior secured revolving credit facility (the “Citi Revolving Financing”) with Citibank, N.A. (“Citibank”), which was secured by collateral consisting primarily of commercial loans and corporate bonds. Borrowings under the Citi Revolving Financing generally bore interest at a rate per annum equal to LIBOR plus 4.85% and the default interest rate was equal to the interest rate then in effect plus 2.00%. As of June 30, 2019, June 30, 2018 and June 30, 2017, there were no borrowings outstanding under the Citi Revolving Financing. On December 8, 2017, we repaid in full all indebtedness, liabilities and other obligations under, and terminated, the Citi Revolving Financing. In accordance with the termination of the Citi Revolving Financing, all liens on the collateral securing the Citi Revolving Financing were released.

As a BDC, we are required to comply with certain regulatory requirements. For instance, as a BDC, we may not acquire any assets other than “qualifying assets” specified in the 1940 Act unless, at the time the acquisition is made, at least 70% of our total assets are qualifying assets (with certain limited exceptions). Qualifying assets include investments in “eligible portfolio companies.” Under the relevant SEC rules, the term “eligible portfolio company” includes all private companies, companies whose securities are not listed on a national securities exchange, and certain public companies that have listed their securities on a national securities exchange and have a market capitalization of less than $250 million. In each case, the company must be organized in the United States. As of June 30, 2019, approximately 9.78% of our total assets were non-qualifying assets.

As of June 30, 2019, our investment portfolio of $306.4 million (at fair value) consisted of debt and equity investments in 33 portfolio companies, of which 77.6% were first lien investments, 18.7% were second lien investments, 3.7% were unitranche loans, and 0.0% were in equities, warrants and other positions. At June 30, 2019, our average and largest portfolio company investment at fair value was $9.3 million and $17.3 million, respectively.

As of June 30, 2018, our investment portfolio of $293.6 million (at fair value) consisted of debt and equity investments in 25 portfolio companies, of which 52.1% were first lien investments, 43.3% were second lien investments, 0.2% were in unsecured debt investments, 4.2% were unitranche loans, and 0.2% were in equities, warrants and other positions. At June 30, 2018, our average and largest portfolio company investment at fair value was $11.7 million and $24.9 million, respectively.

During the twelve months ended June 30, 2019, we added 50 new investments and 10 separate draws on existing revolving credit facilities and delayed draw term loans, totaling approximately $195.2 million. Of these investments, 25 were in new portfolio companies and 25 were in existing portfolio companies. Of these new investments, 93.50% consisted of first lien investments, 6.10% second lien investments, and 0.4% in equity, warrants, and other investments.

During the twelve months ended June 30, 2018, we added 23 new investments and 10 separate draws on existing revolving credit facilities, totaling approximately $172.5 million. Of these investments, 18 were in new portfolio companies and five were in existing portfolio companies. Of these new investments, 83.6% consisted of first lien investments, 16.1% second lien investments, and 0.3% in equity, warrants, and other investments.

95.8% of our debt investments bore interest based on floating rates based on indices such as LIBOR (in certain cases, subject to interest rate floors), and 4.2% bore interest at fixed rates.

As of June 30, 2019, we had $19.7 million of cash as well as $6.6 million in restricted cash and $19.0 million of capacity under the Revolving Financing. As of June 30, 2019, we had approximately $167.5 million of senior securities outstanding and our asset coverage ratio was 186.5%. We intend to generate additional cash primarily from future offerings of securities, future borrowings under the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing as well as cash flows from operations, including income earned from investments in our portfolio companies and, to a lesser extent, from the temporary investment of cash in U.S. government securities and other high-quality debt investments that mature in one year or less. Our primary liquidity needs include interest and principal repayments on our Financing Facilities, our unfunded loan commitments (if any), investments in portfolio companies, dividend distributions to our stockholders and operating expenses.

To qualify for RIC tax treatment, we must, among other things, distribute to our stockholders, with respect to each taxable year, at least 90% of our investment company net taxable income (i.e., our net ordinary income and our realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any). We will also be subject to a federal excise tax, based on distributive requirements of our taxable income on a calendar year basis.

In accordance with certain applicable Treasury regulations and private letter rulings issued by the Internal Revenue Service, a RIC may treat a distribution of its own stock as fulfilling its RIC distribution requirements if each stockholder elects to receive his or her entire distribution in either cash or stock of the RIC, subject to a limitation that the aggregate amount of cash to be distributed to all stockholders must be at least 20% of the aggregate declared distribution. If too many stockholders elect to receive cash, each stockholder electing to receive cash must receive a pro rata amount of cash (with the balance of the distribution paid in stock). In no event will any stockholder, electing to receive cash, receive less than 20% of his or her entire distribution in cash. If these and certain other requirements are met, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the amount of the dividend paid in stock will be equal to the amount of cash that could have been received instead of stock. We have no current intention of paying dividends in shares of our stock in accordance with these Treasury regulations or private letter rulings.

Pursuant to the Prior Advisory Agreement, we agreed to pay to the Adviser a Base Management Fee of 1.75% of gross assets, as adjusted, including assets purchased with borrowed funds or other forms of leverage and excluding cash and cash equivalents and “fair value of derivatives associated with our financing”, and the Incentive Fee consisting of two parts.

Under the Prior Advisory Agreement, the first part of the Incentive Fee, or the Income-Based Fee, which is calculated and payable quarterly in arrears, equals 20.0% of the “pre-incentive fee net investment income” (as defined in the Prior Advisory Agreement) for the immediately preceding quarter, subject to a hurdle rate of 2.0% per quarter (8.0% annualized), and is subject to a “catch-up” feature. The Incentive Fee is subject to a total return requirement, which provides that no Incentive Fee in respect of the Company’s pre-incentive fee net investment income will be payable except to the extent 20.0% of the cumulative net increase in net assets resulting from operations over the then current and 11 preceding quarters exceeds the cumulative incentive fees accrued and/or paid for the 11 preceding quarters. The net pre-incentive fee investment income used to calculate the Income-Based Fee is also included in the amount of our gross assets used to calculate the 1.75% Base Management Fee.

Under the Prior Advisory Agreement, the second part of the incentive fee, or the Capital Gains Fee, is calculated and payable in arrears as of the end of each calendar year and equals 20.0% of the aggregate cumulative realized capital gains from inception through the end of each calendar year, computed net of aggregate cumulative realized capital losses and aggregate cumulative unrealized capital depreciation through the end of such year, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid capital gain incentive fees.

We are subject to financial market risks, including changes in interest rates. At June 30, 2019, 96.8% of our debt investments bore interest based on floating rates, such as LIBOR, the Euro Interbank Offered Rate, the Federal Funds Rate or the Prime Rate. The interest rates on such investments generally reset by reference to the current market index after one to six months. Floating rate investments subject to a floor generally reset by reference to the current market index after one to six months only if the index exceeds the floor.

Generally, we believe higher yielding assets such as those in our investment portfolio do not necessarily follow a linear interest rate relationship and are less sensitive in price to interest rate changes than many other debt investments. Our investments in fixed rate assets are generally exposed to changes in value due to interest rate fluctuations, and our floating rate assets are generally exposed to cash flow variability from fluctuation in rates. Consequently, our net interest income (interest income less interest expense) is exposed to risks related to interest rate fluctuations. Based on our in-place portfolio with certain interest rate floors and our financing at June 30, 2019, a 1.00% increase in interest rates would increase our net interest income by approximately 2.1% and a 2.00% increase in interest rates would increase our net interest income by approximately 10.4%. Variable-rate instruments subject to a floor generally reset periodically to the applicable floor and, in the case of investments in our portfolio, quarterly to a floor based on LIBOR, only if the floor exceeds the index. Under these loans, we do not benefit from increases in interest rates until such rates exceed the floor and thereafter benefit from market rates above any such floor.

(7) First Lien Unitranche Last Out Investment, which accounts for 3.69% of our investment portfolio at fair value.

First Lien Unitranche Last Out Investment, which accounts for 3.69% of our investment portfolio at fair value.

(8) The investment is not a qualifying asset under Section 55(a) of the Investment Company Act of 1940. The Company may not acquire any non-qualifying asset unless, at the time of acquisition, qualifying assets represent at least 70% of the Company’s total assets. Non-qualifying assets represent 9.85% of total assets.

The investment is not a qualifying asset under Section 55(a) of the Investment Company Act of 1940. The Company may not acquire any non-qualifying asset unless, at the time of acquisition, qualifying assets represent at least 70% of the Company’s total assets. Non-qualifying assets represent 9.85% of total assets.

(12) As defined in the 1940 Act, the Company is deemed to be an “Affiliated Person” of this portfolio company because it owns 5% or more of the portfolio company’s outstanding voting securities.

As defined in the 1940 Act, the Company is deemed to be an “Affiliated Person” of this portfolio company because it owns 5% or more of the portfolio company’s outstanding voting securities.

(8) First Lien Unitranche Last Out Investment, which accounts for 4.18% of our investment portfolio at fair value.

First Lien Unitranche Last Out Investment, which accounts for 4.18% of our investment portfolio at fair value.

(9) The investment is not a qualifying asset under Section 55(a) of the Investment Company Act of 1940. The Company may not acquire any non-qualifying asset unless, at the time of acquisition, qualifying assets represent at least 70% of the Company’s total assets. Non-qualifying assets represent 15.88% of total assets.

The investment is not a qualifying asset under Section 55(a) of the Investment Company Act of 1940. The Company may not acquire any non-qualifying asset unless, at the time of acquisition, qualifying assets represent at least 70% of the Company’s total assets. Non-qualifying assets represent 15.88% of total assets.

CM Finance LLC, a Maryland limited liability company, commenced operations in March 2012. Immediately prior to the Offering, CM Finance LLC was merged with and into the Company (the “Merger”). In connection with the Merger, the Company issued 6,000,000 shares of common stock and $39.8 million in debt to the pre-existing CM Finance LLC investors, consisting of funds managed by Cyrus Capital Partners, L.P. (the “Original Investors” or the “Cyrus Funds”). The Company had no assets or operations prior to completion of the Merger and, as a result, the books and records of CM Finance LLC became the books and records of the Company, as the surviving entity. Immediately after the Merger, the Company issued 2,181,818 shares of its common stock to Stifel Venture Corp. in exchange for $32.7 million in cash. The Company used all of the proceeds of the sale of shares to Stifel (“Stifel”), to repurchase 2,181,818 shares of common stock from the Original Investors. Immediately after the completion of the Offering, the Company had 13,666,666 shares outstanding. The Company used a portion of the net proceeds of the Offering to repay 100% of the debt issued to the Original Investors in connection with the Merger.

In connection with the Investcorp Transaction, on June 26, 2019, the Company entered into a definitive stock purchase and transaction agreement with Investcorp BDC Holdings Limited (“Investcorp BDC”), an affiliate of Investcorp (the “Stock Purchase Agreement”), pursuant to which, following the closing of the Investcorp Transaction (the “Closing”) and prior to the second anniversary of the date of the Closing (the “Closing Date”), Investcorp BDC will purchase (i) 680,985 newly issued shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share, which represents 5% of the Company’s common stock outstanding as of June 26, 2019, at the most recently determined net asset value per share of the Company’s common stock at the time of such purchase, as adjusted as necessary to comply with Section 23 of the 1940 Act, and (ii) 680,985 shares of the Company’s common stock in open-market or secondary transactions.

As a BDC, the Company is required to comply with certain regulatory requirements. For instance, as a BDC, the Company must not acquire any assets other than “qualifying assets” specified in the 1940 Act unless, at the time the acquisition is made, at least 70% of total assets are qualifying assets. Qualifying assets include investments in “eligible portfolio companies.” Under the relevant Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) rules, the term “eligible portfolio company” includes all private operating companies, operating companies whose securities are not listed on a national securities exchange, and certain public operating companies that have listed their securities on a national securities exchange and have a market capitalization of less than $250 million, in each case organized and with their principal of business in the United States.

The Company has elected to be treated, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. To qualify and maintain qualification as a RIC, the Company must, among other things, meet certain source of income and asset diversification requirements and distribute to stockholders, for each taxable year, at least 90% of the Company’s “investment company taxable income’’ which is generally the Company’s net ordinary income plus the excess, if any, of realized net short-term capital gains over realized net long-term capital losses. If the Company continues to qualify as a RIC and continues to satisfy the annual distribution requirement, the Company will not have to pay corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes on any income that the Company distributes to its stockholders. The Company intends to make distributions in an amount sufficient to maintain RIC status each year and to avoid any federal income taxes on income. The Company will also be subject to nondeductible U.S. federal excise taxes if the Company does not distribute to its stockholders at least 98% of net ordinary income, 98.2% of capital gains, if any, and any recognized and undistributed income from prior year for which it paid no U.S. federal income taxes. Additionally, certain of the Company’s consolidated subsidiaries are subject to U.S. federal and state income taxes. For the twelve months ended June 30, 2019, June 30, 2018 and June 30, 2017, the Company recorded a provision for taxes of $13,778, $2,579,337, and $0, respectively, for U.S. federal and state income taxes related to Taxable Subsidiaries, respectively.

On May 23, 2013, as amended on June 6, 2013, December 4, 2013, September 26, 2014, July 20, 2015, August 14, 2015, February 28, 2017, November 20, 2017 and June 21, 2019, the Company, through SPV, entered into a $122.0 million financing transaction (the “Term Financing”) due December 5, 2021 with UBS. The Term Financing is collateralized by the portion of the Company’s assets held by SPV (the “SPV Assets”) and pledged as collateral as noted in the Consolidated Schedule of Investments. Prior to June 21, 2019, borrowings under the Term Financing bore interest (i) at a rate per annum equal to one-month London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) plus 2.75% through December 4, 2018, and (ii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 2.55% from December 5, 2018 through December 5, 2020 (the “Term Financing Rate”). The Company also incurred an annual fee of approximately 1% of the outstanding borrowings under the Term Financing.

On June 21, 2019, we amended the Term Financing to increase the Term Financing by $20.0 million from $102.0 million to $122.0 million. On September 30, 2019, with the consent of UBS, we can opt (the “Option’) to increase our Term Financing by up to $53.0 million, expanding the Term Financing to $175.0 million. Borrowings under the Term Financing, as amended, bear interest (a) with respect to the $102.0 million (i) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 2.55% through December 4, 2019, and (ii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.55% from December 5, 2019 through December 4, 2020, and (iii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.15% (if the Option was not exercised) or 2.90% if the Option was exercised from December 5, 2020 through December 5, 2021, and (b) with respect to the additional $20.0 million increase in the Term Financing, (i) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.15% through October 14, 2019, which is the date before the Option Exercise Date, and (ii) at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 2.90% from the Option Exercise Date through December 5, 2021.

On December 4, 2013, as amended on September 26, 2014 and July 17, 2015, the Company, through SPV, entered into a $50.0 million revolving financing (the “2013 UBS Revolving Financing”), which expired in accordance with its terms on December 5, 2016. From December 4, 2013 through September 24, 2014, the 2013 UBS Revolving Financing bore interest at a fixed rate of 2.10% per annum on drawn amounts and 0.50% per annum on any undrawn portion. From September 26, 2014 through December 5, 2016, the 2013 UBS Revolving Financing bore interest at a fixed rate of 2.00% on drawn amounts and 0.50% per annum on any undrawn portion. As of June 30, 2019 and June 30, 2018, there were no borrowings outstanding under the 2013 UBS Revolving Financing.

On November 20, 2017, the Company entered into a $50 million revolving financing facility (the “2017 UBS Revolving Financing”) with UBS. On June 21, 2019, we amended the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing to reduce the size of the facility to $30.0 million. Borrowings under the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing generally bear interest at a rate per annum equal to one-month LIBOR plus 3.55% (the “Revolver Financing Rate”). The Company pays a fee on any undrawn amounts of 2.50% per annum; provided that if 50% or less of the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing is drawn, the fee will be 2.75% per annum. Any amounts borrowed under the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing will mature, and all accrued and unpaid interest will be due and payable, on December 7, 2020. As of June 30, 2019 and June 30, 2018, there were $11.0 million and $17.8 in borrowings outstanding under the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing, respectively.

Borrowings under the Citi Revolving Financing generally bore interest at a rate per annum equal to LIBOR plus 4.85%. The default interest rate was equal to the interest rate then in effect plus 2.00%. The Citi Revolving Financing required the payment of an unused fee of 2.85% annually for any undrawn amounts below 75% of the Citi Revolving Financing, and 0.75% annually for any undrawn amounts above 75% of the Citi Revolving Financing. Borrowings under the Citi Revolving Financing were based on a borrowing base. The Citi Revolving Financing generally required payment of interest on a quarterly basis and all outstanding principal was due upon maturity. The Citi Revolving Financing also required mandatory prepayment of interest and principal upon certain events. As of June 30, 2019 and June 30, 2018, there were no borrowings outstanding under the Citi Revolving Financing.

On July 2, 2018, the Company closed the public offering of $30 million in aggregate principal amount of 6.125% notes due 2023 (the “Notes”). On July 12, 2018, the underwriters exercised their over-allotment option to purchase an additional $4.5 million in aggregate principal amount of the Notes. The total net proceeds to the Company from the Notes, including the exercise of the underwriters’ over-allotment option, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions of approximately $1.0 million and estimated offering expenses of approximately $230,000, were approximately $33.2 million.

The Notes will mature on July 1, 2023 and bear interest at a rate of 6.125%. The Notes are direct unsecured obligations and rank pari passu, which means equal in right of payment, with all outstanding and future unsecured indebtedness issued by the Company. Because the Notes are not secured by any of the Company’s assets, they are effectively subordinated to all of the Company’s existing and future secured unsubordinated indebtedness (or any indebtedness that is initially unsecured as to which we subsequently grant a security interest), to the extent of the value of the assets securing such indebtedness. The Notes are structurally subordinated to all existing and future indebtedness and other obligations of any of the Company’s subsidiaries and financing vehicles, including, without limitation, borrowings under the Term Financing and the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing. The Notes are obligations exclusively of the Company and not of any of the Company’s subsidiaries. None of the Company’s subsidiaries is a guarantor of the Notes and the Notes will not be required to be guaranteed by any subsidiary the Company may acquire or create in the future.

Cash, restricted (as shown on the Consolidated Statements of Assets and Liabilities) is held by the trustee of the Term Financing and the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing, and the Citi Revolving Financing up until its expiration, and is restricted to purchases of investments by SPV and LLC that must meet certain eligibility criteria identified by the Indenture. As of June 30, 2019, SPV and LLC had aggregate assets of $234.5 million, which included $232.8 million of the Company’s portfolio investments at fair value, $0.7 million of accrued interest receivable and $1.0 million in cash held by the trustees of the Term Financing and the 2017 UBS Revolving Financing (together, the “UBS Financing Facility”, and with the Citi Revolving Financing, the “Financing Facilities”). As of June 30, 2018, SPV and LLC had assets of $234.5 million, which included $232.8 million of the Company’s portfolio investments at fair value, $0.7 million of accrued interest receivable and $1.0 million in cash held by the trustee of the UBS Financing Facility. For the twelve months ended June 30, 2019, the weighted average outstanding debt balance and the weighted average stated interest rate under the Financing Facilities was $109.3 million and 5.04%, respectively. For the twelve months ended June 30, 2018, the weighted average outstanding debt balance and the weighted average stated interest rate under the Financing Facilities was $120.9 million and 4.46%, respectively.

Pursuant to the Advisory Agreement, the Company has agreed to pay to the Adviser a base management fee of 1.75% of gross assets, as adjusted, including assets purchased with borrowed funds or other forms of leverage and excluding cash and cash equivalents and “fair value of derivatives associated with the Company’s financing”, and an incentive fee consisting of two parts.

The first part of the incentive fee, which is calculated and payable quarterly in arrears, equals 20.0% of the “pre-incentive fee net investment income” (as defined in the agreement) for the immediately preceding quarter, subject to a hurdle rate of 2.0% per quarter (8.0% annualized), and is subject to a “catch-up” feature. The incentive fee is subject to a total return requirement, which provides that no incentive fee in respect of the Company’s pre-incentive fee net investment income will be payable except to the extent 20.0% of the cumulative net increase in net assets resulting from operations over the then current and 11 preceding quarters exceeds the cumulative incentive fees accrued and/or paid for the 11 preceding quarters. The net pre-incentive fee investment income used to calculate this part of the incentive fee is also included in the amount of the Company’s gross assets used to calculate the 1.75% base management fee.

The second part of the incentive fee is calculated and payable in arrears as of the end of each calendar year and equals 20.0% of the aggregate cumulative realized capital gains from inception through the end of each calendar year, computed net of aggregate cumulative realized capital losses and aggregate cumulative unrealized capital depreciation through the end of such year, less the aggregate amount of any previously paid capital gain incentive fees.

The Adviser agreed to permanently waive: (i) all or portions of base management fees through December 31, 2014, to the extent required to support an annualized dividend yield of 9.0% per annum based on the price per share of the Company’s common stock in the Offering of $15.00, and (ii) all or portions of the incentive fee for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2015 and 2016, to the extent required to support an annualized dividend yield of 9.0%, 9.25% and 9.375% per annum, respectively, based on the price per share of the Company’s common stock in of the Offering of $15.00. Fees permanently waived by the Adviser are not subject to future repayment or recoupment by the Company.

As of June 30, 2019, three of the investment professionals employed by the Adviser as part of its investment team are also employees of Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated or its affiliates and are members of the Adviser’s investment committee designated by Stifel. Although these three investment professionals dedicate substantially all of their time to the business and activities of the Adviser, they are dual employees of both Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated or its affiliates and the Adviser. In addition, a member of the Adviser’s investment committee is an employee of Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated or its affiliates and as a result, may continue to engage in investment advisory activities for Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated or its affiliates. As of June 30, 2019, Stifel owned approximately 16.0% of the Company’s outstanding common stock, and also holds a 20.0% interest in the Adviser.

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